jaredmoody boosted

I'd be willing to tackle all that and if the overall experience on was compelling enough, but in so many areas I find to be as good or better.

The OS itself AND the dev environment was close though, I think it's a lot around app ecosystem. I love some paid apps on mac: Alfred, Airmail, 1Password, Backblaze, Postico to name a few.

It was fun exploring though :)

I think my journey ends here for now.

I'd still have to work out:
- webcam drivers
- backlit keyboard drivers
- backup solution
- photo management (didn't get into it)
- basic task management (I use reminders to sync things like family grocery lists)
- Voice assistant? (Love me some Siri)

I'd miss my unlock with Apple Watch too - I tried BlueProximity, but couldn't get it to work.

My single complaint here is with the integration with - it mounted as a network drive instead of syncing down files - so I had to install the nextcloud desktop application anyway.

Installing @nextcloud using snaps was so nice - I'm used to setting up all the services apache/nginx etc by hand and snaps made this *so* easy.

The instructions were great, I pointed a subdomain of mine at it, setup SSL with letsencrypt and was off and running very, very quickly.

The interface is nice, it synced down my files on both and and it seems to have a strong plugin library too.

Color me impressed.

✔️ Web browsing - Firefox, great

✖️ Password management - I use 1Password, and it's only available on Linux as a browser extension. It works, but :(

Most other apps you would want are there. I hadn't used Snaps before - they're nice! I've read can have performance issues but I didn't experience any trouble.

I noticed in the settings there's integration with @nextcloud, so I setup a nextcloud install for fun...

Maybe it's unfair to compare proprietary and FOSS, but I couldn't find anything I could *pay* for either. I love Airmail on mac, $10.

Moving on...

General computery apps [salute] on are a mixed bag. The calendar/contacts apps are nice, email is a HOT mess. Look at this garbage - geary, thunderbird, evolution, all look straight out of 1995. I had hope for Mailspring but after adding my credentials it just gave me a blank screen.

Really besides that though, everything just worked. My oh-my-zsh theme, git, VSCodium, everything just came over. Nice!

:

brew install postgresql@9.6

/#ubuntu

deb apt.postgresql.org/pub/repos/a YOUR_UBUNTU_VERSION_HERE-pgdg main

wget --quiet -O - postgresql.org/media/keys/ACCC | sudo apt-key add -

apt-get update

apt-get install postgresql-9.6

Four commands I'd have to search the web for *every time* I setup a new box vs one I can easily remember.

Homebrew is 1000x better here IMO.

Today in my attempt to migrate to / - setting up my dev environment. For the most part, this was great - almost exactly the same as getting setup on Mac for me.

I think the main difference was having to add keys for apt sources - this seems like an unnecessary hassle.

Consider the following procedures for installing postgresql 9.6 on vs

@birdydon Not really - I'm never going to buy and plug in an external WiFi adapter when I have one built in.

Sort of misses my point - which was, again, if you want adoption into any community, you have to eliminate as much friction as possible. I *want* to use Linux and this is hard for even me - who is *very* tech savvy.

I've gotten it working after much forum searching and tinkering, but the experience was poor.

Sure, it's a superficial take, but if the UI I'm looking at makes me twitch, I can't use it day in day out.

Also care put into design often translates into care elsewhere, including UX, and UX is everything.

From this quick boot/click around, I pick - the good ui, minimal fluff and encryption by default is attractive.

I'll toot more impressions afterI dive in further.

Can I actually be productive with it? TBD.

For something billing itself as a "replacement for Windows and macOS", I had _much_ higher expectations for the look and feel of .

It looks like a bad mashup of OS X and cartoony linux gui that I remember from who knows how long ago. Also look at the layout on the settings screen. Hard pass.

I said "nope" out loud as soon loaded and immediately reminded me of windows. Maybe that's a good thing for some, but I don't need a start menu ever again.

I'm sure you can change it but 🤷🏼‍♂️

Next was - this was a nice touch during setup: gave me option to select language, keyboard layout - and had a mac option.

Overall feel is very similar to , but seems to have a lot fewer apps installed by default.

Also robots are cute.

Onward. The default desktop is...attractive IMO. Nice and clean and the bar across the top feels familiar enough to be comfortable.

However, there seems to be amazon/google things sprinkled around? I'm trying to move *further away* from our corporate overlords. A little distasteful to me.

@jaredmoody almost gave up right there. Sort of sums up the overall impression that’s kept me away from Linux - I don’t want to spend my time figuring out how to get my computer to connect to the internet, tinkering with drivers etc.

If you want people to adopt, WiFi needs to just work.

I’m sure this wouldn’t be trivial but maybe just ship the installer with a large selection of network drivers and detect the correct one on install?

@jaredmoody first major hurdle/bummer - none of these installs worked out of the box with my wireless card.

1 minute into boot and I’m searching forums for answers on a second computer.

Found the info/package I need, but can’t install it because no network. Plug in Ethernet they said - don’t have it. Tried instructions to download package onto usb stick and then install from file but didn’t work. Finally plugged iPhone in and tethered.

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